McCoy Marketing L.L.C. © 2016
Sound Tracks Magazine
A resource for career musicians
Terms and Use Return Return
The Best International Artist
Can You Remove Your Songs From Streaming Services?
You’ve worked hard to create great original songs. In an effort to promote them you’ve posted on the major social sites, purchased a website and built an email list from concerts. One of the major scores is having your songs on streaming services. Good exposure and gets your name up there with the major acts. Beware it’s a dual sided sward. With your songs available for free and at the most seven dollars a month, why would anyone buy your CDs? Industry statistics have proven this true. So the major part of your income still comes from clubs and concerts. Most streaming services do not allow you to remove your songs. Just closing your account won’t do it. It makes sense from their point. The less songs available the smaller the selection, which reduces the worth of a paid subscription. It also reduces advertising sales. This is spelled out in the terms and agreements but most don’t read them. As explained by one of the major services “our right to stream the tracks of any music or comedy album arises from section 114 of the U.S. Copyright Code – this is called a compulsory license. This law includes the terms and conditions under which the copyrighted material may be used, the royalties that must be paid, and the organization to whom those royalties and associated reporting must be made. This means, the license terms are imposed on all parties by Federal Law. Rightsholders cannot opt-out, nor can they alter the terms and conditions that govern”. All the services currently pay to the PROs (Performing Rights Organizations like ASCAP, BMI, SESAC) for performance of musical compositions, and to SoundExchange® for performance of sound recordings. By placing your track into the stream of commerce in the United States, whether through iTunes®, Tunecore®, or any other kind of distribution, you have “distributed your recording to the public under the authority of the copyright owner (the artist and your label)”. Streaming services can therefore rely on the compulsory license and do not need a direct license from you, the copyright owner. This is the same type of license that is used by terrestrial radio, except they are not required to pay any performance fees for use of your sound recording.” Who benefits? The listener who has with low or no free access to millions of songs. On the other hand streaming service are paying hi royalties and actually running at a loss, sounds contradictory to their valuation which can run into the hundreds of millions. Start ups fall victim to the competition with many closing within the first three years of operation. You the artist have become a victim of modern technology. Sounds complicated but it boils down to one thing, once your songs are posted they’re there permanently and you are restricted from advertising. You can post live and studio versions of the same song with different lengths. Read more: fact-sheet/public-performance-right-sound-recordings Read more: uscode/text/17/114
McCoy Marketing L.L.C.  2016 Terms and Use
A resource for career musicians
Return Return
The Best In Independent International Artist
Can You Remove Your Songs From Streaming Services?
You’ve worked hard to create great original songs. In an effort to promote them you’ve posted on the major social sites, purchased a website and built an email list from concerts. One of the major scores is having your songs on streaming services. Good exposure and gets your name up there with the major acts. Beware it’s a dual sided sward. With your songs available for free and at the most seven dollars a month, why would anyone buy your CDs? Industry statistics have proven this true. So the major part of your income still comes from clubs and concerts. Most streaming services do not allow you to remove your songs. Just closing your account won’t do it. It makes sense from their point. The less songs available the smaller the selection, which reduces the worth of a paid subscription. It also reduces advertising sales. This is spelled out in the terms and agreements but most don’t read them. As explained by one of the major services “our right to stream the tracks of any music or comedy album arises from section 114 of the U.S. Copyright Code – this is called a compulsory license. This law includes the terms and conditions under which the copyrighted material may be used, the royalties that must be paid, and the organization to whom those royalties and associated reporting must be made. This means, the license terms are imposed on all parties by Federal Law. Rightsholders cannot opt-out, nor can they alter the terms and conditions that govern”. All the services currently pay to the PROs (Performing Rights Organizations like ASCAP, BMI, SESAC) for performance of musical compositions, and to SoundExchange® for performance of sound recordings. By placing your track into the stream of commerce in the United States, whether through iTunes®, Tunecore®, or any other kind of distribution, you have “distributed your recording to the public under the authority of the copyright owner (the artist and your label)”. Streaming services can therefore rely on the compulsory license and do not need a direct license from you, the copyright owner. This is the same type of license that is used by terrestrial radio, except they are not required to pay any performance fees for use of your sound recording.” Who benefits? The listener who has with low or no free access to millions of songs. On the other hand streaming service are paying hi royalties and actually running at a loss, sounds contradictory to their valuation which can run into the hundreds of millions. Start ups fall victim to the competition with many closing within the first three years of operation. You the artist have become a victim of modern technology. Sounds complicated but it boils down to one thing, once your songs are posted they’re there permanently and you are restricted from advertising. You can post live and studio versions of the same song with different lengths. Read more: fact-sheet/public-performance- right-sound-recordings Read more: uscode/text/17/114